Blaviana“ was finally sold

Cartography in the 17th century

Andreas Bureus, Founder Of Swedish Scientific Cartography

Cartography became scientific in Sweden-Finland at the beginning of the 17th century, when the Swedish cartographer Andreas Bureus (1571-1646) started the mapping of the North based on scientific measurements.LAPPONIA, the map of the northern parts of Scandinavia was the first, published in 1610, and the map of the whole of the Nordic Countries was finished in 1626. At the same time also the Swedish Survey Board began its activity, as well as the corresponding institute in Finland in 1633. The excellent map of Bureus served as an example to later Central European cartographers for nearly two centuries.

Royal Geographers - The Sansons Family

The centre of the production of geographical maps was moved from the Netherlands to France at the beginning of the 17th century, and not least because of the activity of the Sanson family. Very clear versions, based on Bureus, on the areas of the Nordic Countries and Finland were presented from the middle of the 17th century onwards by the cartographers belonging to the French Sanson family, in two generations. The cartographic activity in the family was started by Nicolas Sanson senior (1600-1667). The story goes that the only property that Nicolas had when he moved to Paris was a map of old Gallia or France that he had drawn.It happened, however, to please Cardinal Richelieu, leader of France, and this is how Nicolas got into the favour of the court and was nominated royal geographer, teacher of geography. The title was passed on in the family. Nicolas Sanson was a most productive cartographer:he published approximately 300 maps in all and atlases on all the four known continents. All three sons of Nicolas Sanson, Nicolas Sanson junior, Guillaume and Adrian, continued their father's work. Nicolas's son-in-law Pierre Duval was also a well-known cartographer.

I'm GIS Analyst (geographic information systems)

by TeabaggeryForTwo

I do a lot of collection, creation, management, processing, analysis, and graphical representation (cartography) of spatial data relating to all kinds of projects -- infrastructure, public health/safety, environment, and more. It's a very narrow niche, and I have no interest in information technology per se... I'm more of a geographer than a techie person. The problem with GIS is that in order to "progress" past a certain point (the point that I'm at) it's generally necessary to become a programmer and/or code monkey of some sort -- totally not up my alley.

I'm GIS Analyst (geographic information systems

I do a lot of collection, creation, management, processing, analysis, and graphical representation (cartography) of spatial data relating to all kinds of projects -- infrastructure, public health/safety, environment, and more. It's a very narrow niche, and I have no interest in information technology per se... I'm more of a geographer than a techie person.
The problem with GIS is that in order to "progress" past a certain point (the point that I'm at) it's generally necessary to become a programmer and/or code monkey of some sort -- totally not up my alley.

Cornell University Press Cartographies of Tsardom: The Land and Its Meanings in Seventeenth-Century Russia
Book (Cornell University Press)
  • Used Book in Good Condition
Some Notable Surveyors and Map-Makers of the Sixteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth Centuries and their Work: A Study in the History of Cartography
Book (Cambridge University Press)
Mary Evans Photo Jigsaw Puzzle of 17th century Map of the Turkish Empire in Asia from Mary Evans
Home (Mary Evans)
  • PHOTO JIGSAW PUZZLE This Photo Puzzle features a cropped image of 17th century Map of the Turkish Empire in Asia chosen by Mary Evans. Estimated image size 356x254mm.
  • 10x14 Photo Puzzle with 252 pieces. Packed in black cardboard box of dimensions 5 5/8 x 7 5/8 x 1 1/5. Puzzle image 5x7 affixed to box top. Puzzle pieces printed...
  • Image Description 17th century Map of the Turkish Empire in Asia 17th century Map of the Turkish Empire in Asia c. 1687.
  • For any queries regarding this image please contact Mary Evans quoting Reference 8700347
  • Image supplied and selected by Mary Evans. (c) Antiquarian Images/Mary Evans
The world on paper;: Cartography in Amsterdam in the 17th century
Book (Amsterdams Historisch Museum)
Routledge Writing, Geometry and Space in Seventeenth-Century England and America: Circles in the Sand (Routledge Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture)
Book (Routledge)
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